REPORT: Problem-oriented policing found to be effective in reducing crime and disorder

Date published: 16 June 2020 13:47
Dated: 16 June 2020 14:39:17

A new report on problem-oriented policing has been published (15 June), concluding that the strategy is effective in reducing crime and disorder.

The updated findings of the globally recognised systematic review on The Effects of Problem-Oriented Policing on Crime and Disorder, which was last published in 2008, reinforce the need for police forces to take a problem-oriented approach to policing.

The review, which was developed by the Campbell Collaboration and can be found here, demonstrates that by taking a problem-oriented approach, crime and disorder could be reduced by around one-third, compared with alternative approaches.

To create the report, researchers collated up-to-date evidence on whether problem-oriented policing is effective in reducing crime and disorder, and looked at the evidence on the effects of different problem-oriented policing approaches, the impact on different crime types and the evidence of cost-effectiveness.

The Problem Solving and Demand Reduction Programme, now called the Problem Solving and Crime Prevention Programme, commissioned the updated review to help establish whether problem-oriented policing continued to be relevant to current policing, which continues to change as demands on services increase.

Assistant Chief Constable Lauren Poultney, Senior Responsible Officer for the Problem Solving and Crime Prevention Programme, said: “We welcome the findings of the 2020 review on The Effects of Problem-Oriented Policing on Crime and Disorder. The review concludes that problem-oriented policing is effective in reducing crime and disorder, and directly supports the work that we are doing to embed a structured problem solving ethos and capability, to reduce demand for police and our partners.

“This review will assist police forces and partner agencies in identifying and responding to various problems, and will provide the evidence needed on the impact of problem solving for the creation of successful business cases and decisions on allocation of spending.

“Crucially, the review should provide further encouragement for all forces to make problem-oriented policing central to how they operate.”

Dr Peter Neyroud, former Chief Constable of Thames Valley and now an academic at the University of Cambridge’s Institute of Criminology, coordinated the project to produce the review for the international Campbell Collaboration. “This systematic review shows that well delivered Problem-Oriented Policing will reduce crime and disorder by a third. As with all Campbell Collaboration Systematic Reviews, the findings are based on the most comprehensive review of the best research evidence from across the world. Problem-Oriented Policing is a powerful and effective strategy for police that can be used to prevent crime and reduce harm whether it be in tackling robberies or policing the COVID 19 Pandemic”

The Problem Solving and Crime Prevention Programme, led by South Yorkshire Police on behalf of all police forces in England and Wales, aims to transform ways of working across the police at local, regional and national levels. To find out more about the Programme, and its other work streams, visit https://www.southyorkshire.police.uk/find-out/problem-solving-and-demand-reduction-programme/

Related Content

No related content found